Ansys CFX – Vortex Generator 3D

Written by cfd.ninja

March 12, 2020

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In fluid dynamics, a vortex is a region in a fluid in which the flow revolves around an axis line, which may be straight or curved. Vortices form in stirred fluids, and may be observed in smoke rings, whirlpools in the wake of a boat, and the winds surrounding a tropical cyclone, tornado or dust devil.

Vortices are a major component of turbulent flow. The distribution of velocity, vorticity (the curl of the flow velocity), as well as the concept of circulation are used to characterize vortices. In most vortices, the fluid flow velocity is greatest next to its axis and decreases in inverse proportion to the distance from the axis.

In the absence of external forces, viscous friction within the fluid tends to organize the flow into a collection of irrotational vortices, possibly superimposed to larger-scale flows, including larger-scale vortices. Once formed, vortices can move, stretch, twist, and interact in complex ways. A moving vortex carries with it some angular and linear momentum, energy, and mass.

In this tutorial you will learn to simulate an Vortex Generator in 3D using Ansys CFX. You can download the mesh from this link

Ansys CFX – NACA 4412 (Structured Mesh)

Ansys CFX – NACA 4412 (Structured Mesh)

The NACA four-digit wing sections define the profile by:
First digit describing maximum camber as percentage of the chord.
Second digit describing the distance of maximum camber from the airfoil leading edge in tenths of the chord.

Tutorial: NACA Airfoil 3D using Ansys Fluent.

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