Ansys Fluent – Fluidized Bed

Written by cfd.ninja

March 10, 2020

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A fluidized bed is a physical phenomenon occurring when a quantity of a solid particulate substance (usually present in a holding vessel) is placed under appropriate conditions to cause a solid/fluid mixture to behave as a fluid. This is usually achieved by the introduction of pressurized fluid through the particulate medium. This results in the medium then having many properties and characteristics of normal fluids, such as the ability to free-flow under gravity, or to be pumped using fluid type technologies.

The resulting phenomenon is called fluidization. Fluidized beds are used for several purposes, such as fluidized bed reactors (types of chemical reactors), solids separation,[1] fluid catalytic cracking, fluidized bed combustion, heat or mass transfer or interface modification, such as applying a coating onto solid items. This technique is also becoming more common in aquaculture for the production of shellfish in integrated multi-trophic aquaculture systems.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to simulate a Fluidized Bed using Ansys Fluent (Eulerian). Also you could create the geometry and mesh using DesignModeler and Ansys Meshing.

Tutorial: Compressible Flow using ANSYS Fluent.

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