Ansys CFX – Compressible Flow

Written by cfd.ninja

March 12, 2020

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Source: Ansys

Compressibility effects are encountered in gas flows at high velocity and/or in which there are large pressure variations. When the flow velocity approaches or exceeds the speed of sound of the gas or when the pressure change in the system ( $Delta p /p$) is large, the variation of the gas density with pressure has a significant impact on the flow velocity, pressure, and temperature.

The Spalart-Allmaras model is a relatively simple one-equation model that
solves a modeled transport equation for the kinematic eddy (turbulent) viscosity. This embodies a relatively new class of one-equation models in which
it is not necessary to calculate a length scale related to the local shear layer
thickness. The Spalart-Allmaras model was designed specifically for aerospace
applications involving wall-bounded flows and has been shown to give good results for boundary layers subjected to adverse pressure gradients.

In this tutorial you will learn to simulate external compressible flow using Ansys CFX. This is a very easy tutorial for beginners to use this tool. You can download the mesh from this link.

We share the same tutorial using ANSYS Fluent.

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